CIP vs Non-CIP

The following is a cross-reference analysis of the statistics compiled through researching the surveys administered to both CIP and Non-CIP.

Overview

Our research shows conflicting statistics between how non-CIP and CIP view CIP youth. This continued disconnect creates the ongoing misunderstanding of what CIP are really thinking and feeling. These statistics provide a small window into some of the misconceptions that can lead to an ever-growing stigma between CIP and Non-CIP in our community. We believe that the our statistics provide a solid foundation to begin our conversation.   

Findings
  • 90% of Non-CIP agree/strongly agree that CIP are likely to suffer from guilt, if the parent committed the crime for the benefit of the family.

  • Only 5% of  CIP agree/strongly agree that they sometimes think it is their fault that their parent is in prison.

  • 63% of Non-CIP believe that CIP are ashamed of their incarcerated parent.

  • Contrary to popular belief, more than 2/3 of the CIP that we surveyed did not have negative feelings, like anger and shame, toward their parent who is in prison.

  • 90% of Non-CIP disagree/strongly disagree that CIP should be advised to keep the information about their incarcerated parent private from counselors and nurses at school.

  • 47% of CIP agree/strongly agree that it is best if they do not talk to their counselors and nurses at school about their parent in prison.

  • 83% of Non-CIP disagree/strongly disagree that it is best to hide the truth about the incarcerated parent from the child.

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This program is made possible in part  through a partnership with the Connecticut Children with Incarcerated Parents (CTCIP) Initiative, a project of the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy (IMRP) at Central Connecticut State University (CCSU). For more information, visit www.ctcip.org.

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